top of page

Skating Accommodation Memorandum (S.A.M.)

A Skating Accommodation Memorandum (S.A.M.) provides appropriate and reasonable accommodations for skaters with disabilities who are testing moves in the field and freestyle and competing in non-qualifying 6.0 competitions. 

 

Any skater with a disability, regardless of track, may request reasonable accommodations for competitions and testing through the Skating Accommodation Memorandum (S.A.M.), a form found in the Adaptive Skating section of the USFS website's Members Only section. Past accommodations have included, but are not limited to, seating near the ice, prioritized skating order, and adjusted music volume.

 

From U.S. Figure Skating: To submit to the S.A.M. or for more information, please contact Courtney Fecske, Chair of the Adaptive Committee, at courtneyjweisman@gmail.com

FAQ

This information on this page is from U.S. Figure Skating and may change at any time. Please visit Adaptive Skating or contact U.S.F.S. directly for the latest information.

 

What is the rationale for providing skaters with a S.A.M.?

  • Create equitable skating standards for skaters with disabilities

  • Develop increased opportunities for skaters with disabilities

  • Provide reasonable accommodations for skaters with disabilities

  • Support an inclusive and welcoming space in the U.S. Figure Skating testing and

    nonqualifying 6.0 competitive tracks for skaters with disabilities

What is a S.A.M.?

  • A Skating Accommodation Memorandum (S.A.M.) provides appropriate and reasonable accommodations for skaters with disabilities who are testing moves in the field and freestyle and competing in nonqualifying 6.0 competitions.

  • These accommodations are determined collaboratively through the review of the skater’s medical documentation by a disability specialist on the Adaptive Skating Subcommittee.

  • When necessary, other committees (i.e., testing, competition, and sports science and medicine) will be consulted as well.

 

How do I request a S.A.M.?

Any skater with a disability, regardless of track, may request reasonable accommodations for competitions and testing through the Skating Accommodation Memorandum (S.A.M.), a form found in the Adaptive Skating section of the USFS website's Members Only section.

 

Past accommodations have included, but are not limited to, seating near the ice, prioritized skating order, and adjusted music volume.

 

To submit to the S.A.M. or for more information, please contact Courtney Fecske, Chair of the Adaptive Committee, at courtneyjweisman@gmail.com

Testing

  • The skater or skater’s guardian submits a completed S.A.M. request form that includes necessary medical documentation to a disability specialist on the Adaptive Skating Subcommittee.

  • A disability specialist reviews documentation and contacts additional relative committees when necessary (Testing, Competition, and/or Sport Sciences and Medicine) to determine appropriate and reasonable skating accommodations.

  • Skater is emailed an official S.A.M. to use throughout one season of testing (it needs to be renewed each season).

Non-qualifying 6.0 competition

 

  • The skater or skater’s guardian submits a completed S.A.M. request form that includes necessary medical documentation to a disability specialist on the Adaptive Skating Subcommittee.

  • A disability specialist reviews documentation and contacts other relative committees when necessary (Testing, Competition, and/or Sport Sciences and Medicine) to determine appropriate and reasonable skating accommodations.

  • Skater is emailed an official S.A.M. to use throughout one season of competition (it needs to be renewed each season).

What does a test chair of MFSCH or Local Organizing Committee (LOC) do when they receive a S.A.M.?

  • A skater or their parent/guardian needs to submit their approved S.A.M. by the designated test or competition registration deadline or accommodations cannot be ensured.

  • A test chair will notify the judges/judge-in-charge serving on a panel who is testing a skater using a S.A.M.

  • The LOC will notify the Chief Referee of the S.A.M.

  • For competition or testing, the officials will follow the directions of the S.A.M. and assess the skater as expected with regard to any accommodations provided.

 

How does an official respond notified of a skater using a S.A.M. at a test session or nonqualifying 6.0 competition?

  • A judge or referee will read and follow the S.A.M.’s explicit directions.

  • If the official, Chief Referee, test chair or LOC have questions in regard to the S.A.M.,

    please contact the chair of the Adaptive Skating Subcommittee immediately.

  • Officials, Chief Referees, test chairs or LOCs should NEVER ask medical-based or

    personal questions to the skater or their parent/guardian.

  • The official will judge as they typically do while following the prescribed S.A.M.

bottom of page